The prevalence and related factors of phantom vibration among medical students: A first look in Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Background: Phantom vibration (PV) is an illusionary perception in which people perceive their mobile phone vibrates while it actually does not. Recently, PV has attracted attention in psychology and medical field. There are several studies investigating the prevalence and risk factors associated with this phenomenon. However, the findings are inconsistent. The prevalence of PV fluctuates from 21% to 89% among different groups and its mechanism remains unclear. Further understanding is necessary to identify the settings in which PV may harm the population and warrant further exploration.

Objectives: This study aims to explore the prevalence of PV among medical students in Ho Chi Minh City and settings that PV can risk people’s health. Relationships between PV and phone usage habits as well as psychiatric disturbance also are investigated.

Methods: By using online questionnaire on 377 undergraduate medical students in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, the cross-sectional study explored factors associated with PV, including demographic, behavioral phone usage, and mental/emotional factors using the Self Reporting Questionaire - 20 (SRQ-20). The descriptive and association analyses were employed using R software.

Results: The study found a significant association between mental/emotional factors (i.e. mental disturbance and phone attachment) and PV (OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.21-3.81, p value=0.009; OR=1.75, 95% CI=1.02-3.01, p value=0.043 respectively), which suggests an important role of mental/emotional factors in explaining the potential mechanism of PV. A high proportion of participants also experienced PV while driving (55.5%) within the last month. This implies the impact of PV possibly becomes significant, causing an increase in the risk of traffic accident due to distracted driving.

Graphical abstract

Online training needs of Methadone Maintenance Treatment clinics in southern Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Introduction: Continuing Medical Education (CME) significantly improves the competency of healthcare workers in Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) clinics. However, CME courses are very costly, and a few participants fully attended a course. Online training is an alternative approach to efficiently improve training outcomes. The study assessed needs and possibility of online training courses of MMT clinics in southern Vietnam.

Methods: A google form was designed to collect characteristics, man-powers, facilities, online activities and training needs of MMT clinics. E-mails were sent to all MMT clinics in southern Vietnam to ask for their participants. A representative of MMT clinics who satisfied the inclusion invited to complete the form.

Result: 93 MMT clinics completed the survey. The response rate was 62% (93/150). One MMT clinic had 3 doctors/assistant doctors, 3 pharmacists/drug dispensers, 2 consultants and 3 other professionals on average. The number of clients visiting the clinic in the last month was 150. About 94% (93/95) of MMT clinics provide other additional services. On average, 385 clients came to MMT for other services. All clinics had adequate devices for online and blended training.

Conclusion: MMT clinics had high training needs and were willing to attend online and blended training courses. Online and blended training were possible in MMT clinics.

Graphical abstract

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