Validity and Reliability of the Comfort Behavior Scale in Children Undergoing Wound Dressing Replacement in Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Background: This study translated and culturally adapted the Comfort Behavior Scale (Comfort-B) into Vietnamese using a standard protocol guided by the World Health Organization.

Methods: The Comfort-B was translated into Vietnamese and then English back-translated by independent translators. These versions were reviewed and assessed by a Vietnamese expert’s panel and an English expert’s panel. Thirty-four nurses of the Nhi Dong 1 Hospital were invited to use the Vietnamese Comfort-B to assess pain while watching five videos recorded before, during and after wound dressing replacement. The eight characteristics of the Vietnamese Comfort-B were assessed by 34 nurses. Fifteen nurses agreed to do the second assessment two weeks from the first assessment. The content validity index was used to assess the relevance and clarity of all items and the whole scale. Agreements between raters were explored using Kappa statistics. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Multi-level linear regression was used to assess changes in the Vietnamese Comfort-B before, during and after wound dressing replacement between two assessments.

Results: The Vietnamese Comfort-B was accredited by the Vietnamese expert’s panel. The English-back translated version was approved by the English expert’s panel. The nurses agreed that the Vietnamese Comfort-B can be used in clinical practice and research. Kappas of all items were ≥0.96 indicating excellent agreement between raters. Alpha coefficients of two assessments were ≥0.97 indicating excellent internal consistency. All ICCs ≥ 0.79 indicated good intra-rater and inter-rater reliability.

Conclusions: The study suggested that the Vietnamese Comfort-B can be used for future studies assessing children’s pain in the local hospital context.

Graphical abstract

The effectiveness of “I PASS The BATON” model in improving nursing handover at a university hospital in Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Introduction: Nursing handover is an important process in hospital care where information and responsibilities are transferred from one nurse to another to ensure continuity of care and safety of patients. However, evidence of the effectiveness of using standardized nursing handover approaches, particularly in resource-limited countries, is scarce. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the change in handover practice through the “I PASS the BATON” model in a university hospital in Vietnam and identify factors contributing to the effectiveness of this model.

Material and methods: We provided handover training for nurses in the Emergency Department using the “I PASS the BATON” model and evaluated their application right after the course and one month after the course.

Results: The consistency of the handover skill among participating nurses remained high one month after applying the model in the routine care at the hospital. Overall, the mean score achieved after training was high and remained unchanged after one month. However, significant and marginally significant improvement was found in some components one month after the course including the Action and Timing. In contrast, the Next component decreased over time. Evaluation of nurses’ perceptions about the model were assessed using the Health Belief Model which revealed that perceived susceptibility and seriousness were at the moderate level and significantly decreased after one month. In contrast, perceived benefits and barriers were at a high level and remained unchanged after one month.

Conclusions: The "I PASS the BATON" model was effective in improving nurses’ handover skills and practices.

Graphical abstract

Efficacy of ethanol ablation for treatment of benign cystic thyroid nodules: the first hospital-based study in Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Background: In Vietnam, surgery or aspiration is preferred to treat thyroid cysts however each of them still have limitations. Purposes of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ethanol ablation in treating thyroid cysts and determine factors that predict the outcome of treatment.

Methods: This prospective study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Institutional Review Board of Family hospital and written informed consent for procedures was obtained. From May 2018 to March 2019, 23 patients who underwent treatment for thyroid cysts by EA were enrolled in this study and were followed up for 1 month at Family hospital. The primary endpoint was efficient after one month as the volume reduction ratio was ≥ 50%. Secondary endpoints were improvements in symptoms, cosmetic scores, and safety. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used.

Results: In the finding, from May 2018 to March 2019, only 17 patients who matched inclusion criteria were included in the analyst, including 7 purely thyroid cysts, and 10 predominantly cystic nodules. Mean volume decreased significantly from 5.21 ± 3.37 ml to 2.35 ± 2.52 ml in corresponding to 52.87% of volume reduction with p < 0.05. Ethanol ablation (EA) success rate was 52.90% after 1 month. Symptoms and cosmetic scores were improved significantly. The thyroid function was constant. No adverse events occurred. Purely thyroid cyst was a predictive factor contributing to the success of EA.

Conclusion: EA seems likely to be a safe and an efficient therapy for patients who had purely or predominantly cystic thyroid nodules.

Graphical abstract

Familial achalasia with an autosomal dominant pattern of inherence: Report of a Vietnamese family

Case Study

Abstract

Current pathophysiologic knowledge of achalasia suggests the important involvement of genetic predisposition. However, familial achalasia is very rare and most of the case reports in literature have shown an autosomal recessive pattern of inherence. We hereby report a case of familial achalasia with autosomal dominant pattern of inherence affecting ten members in three generations of a Vietnamese family.

Graphical abstract

Validity and Reliability of Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Background: The study aimed to culturally adapt and validate Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS) for use in Vietnamese settings.

Methods: The original NIPS was translated into Vietnamese using a standard protocol. Registered nurses of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), Tien Giang General Hospital, Vietnam used the Vietnamese NIPS for assessing neonatal pain and then provided feedback on acceptability of the scale. Five registered nurses of NICU were randomly selected and used NIPS for assessing neonatal pain while watching thirty videos at two times, two weeks apart from each other. Pulse rates per minute and oxygen saturation (SpO2) were also recorded for validity evaluation. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) with two-way random effects were applied to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Multilevel linear regression was applied to assess the association between NIPS score with pulse rates and SpO2 adjusting for raters, three periods and two assessments.

Results: The Vietnamese NIPS was accepted and valued by nurses at the NICU. ICCs between the first and second assessments were from 0.53 to 1.00 for five raters before, during and after clinical procedures showing moderate to excellent intra-rater reliability. ICCs among five raters were moderate to good before and after, but poor (ICC<0.4) during clinical procedures. NIPS score was not associated with SpO2, but with pulse rates per minute.

Conclusions: The preliminary results showed that the Vietnamese version of NIPS is reliable and should be used. However, it is recommended that further research should be conducted to confirm its reliability and validity.

Graphical abstract

Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among Vietnamese adults: prevalence, risk factors and antibiotic susceptibility profile

Original Research

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has long been recognized as an important human pathogen causing many severe diseases. It is also a part of human normal flora with its ecological niche in the human anterior nares. This study focused on screening S. aureus nasal carriage in community and its relationship to human physiological and pathological factors which have not been studied in Vietnam previously. Two hundred and five volunteers in Ho Chi Minh City from 18 to 35 and over 59 years old both male and female participated in the study. Result showed that the prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in southern Vietnamese community was relatively low, only 11.2% (23/205), much lower than that in other international reports on human S. aureus. In addition, nasal carriage of the older age group (> 59 years old, 13.7%) was higher than that of younger age (18-35 years old, 10.4%). Other potential risk factors such as gender, career, height, weight, history of antibiotic usage, daily nasal wash, use of nasal medication sprays, acne problems, smoking and nasal problems showed no significant impact on S. aureus carriage. The obtained S. aureus nasal isolates were all sensitive to vancomycin. Lincomycin and tetracycline had low resistance rate with 4.3 % and 17.4 %, respectively. However, the isolates showed particularly high rate of multidrug resistance (54.2%) In summary, our data provided researchers an overview on S. aureus nasal carriage and antibiotic susceptibility profile of the community- isolated S. aureus in Vietnam. This would serve as valuable information on assessing risk of community-acquired S. aureus infections.

Graphical abstract

Prevalence of Sick Building Syndrome - Related Factors among Hospital Workers at University Medical Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Original Research

Abstract

Poor indoor air quality is one of the most important factor causing occupational health problems such as sick building syndrome (SBS). Most previous research on risk factors of SBS is evaluated in the office or school environments rather than in the hospital. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of SBS and its related effect on hospital workers in poorly-ventilated and confined working environments through a set of the questionnaires completed from March to June of 2017. The relationship between SBS-Related symptoms, individual characteristics, work environment and conditions were analyzed using Poisson regression. The prevalence of sick building syndrome was 70.1%. The most common symptoms reported by hospital workers include fatigue, headache, and feeling heavy-headed. There was a significant relationship between the prevalence of syndrome and sex, overload of work, atopy as well as varying room temperature.

Graphical abstract

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