Effectiveness and safety of thread embedding acupuncture for drug-resistant epilepsy outpatient in Viet Nam: a two-arm parallel design, randomized, controlled clinical trial

Original Research

Abstract

Introduction: People with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) are at high risk of sudden unexpected deaths and lower quality of life. Experiments showed thread embedding acupuncture (TEA) has a seizure-reducing effect; however, data on DRE has been limited. This trial aimed to establish the efficacy and safety of TEA in people with DRE.

Method: This was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial conducted on 30 DRE outpatients, which was fulfilled drug-resistant International League Against Epilepsy. The study was conducted at the Epilepsy clinic, Nguyen Tri Phuong Hospital, Ho Chi Minh City, from December 2020 to March 2022. All procedures for TEA and sham TEA (STEA) groups were identical. Seizure frequency diaries at the baseline and monthly follow-up visits by the participants. The Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) scores at the baseline and 16 weeks; the National Hospital Seizure Severity Scale (NHS3) scores at the baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks and the adverse events at monthly follow-up visits by a researcher.

Results: A reduction in relative seizure frequency and the score change in QOLIE-31 and NHS3 in the TEA group were significantly different from the STEA group when analyzing each group separately (p<0.05). However, when comparing two groups, no significant difference was found in the change in seizure freedom and QOLIE-31 (p>0.05). Mild pain appeared in all participants after the intervention, but no serious adverse effects of TEA were observed.

Conclusion: TEA is a safe technique to use in people with DRE. However, the effectiveness of TEA needs further study. 

Graphical abstract

The laparoscopic surgery results of isolated enteric duplication in the transverse mesocolon: A case report

Case Study

Abstract

Introduction: Enteric duplication cysts found throughout the alimentary tract are rare congenital mass lesions, which usually share a common wall with the gastrointestinal tract. However, many cases of isolated enteric duplication (IED) cysts, reported in the literature, are without any attachment to the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of an IED cyst located in the transverse mesocolon, which was successful treatment with laparoscopy, in Children’s Hospital #1, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Case presentation: A girl turned 3 years old presented with dull abdominal pain and vomiting. Abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed a lesion located around duodenojejunal flexure with a thick wall. Laparoscopy detected a mobile cystic mass found on the mesentery of the transverse colon, which was not connection or attachment to any part of the adjacent intestine. Histopathology of the cyst wall was compatible with an EDC.

Conclusion: The IED cyst is an unusual phenomenon that confuse with other diagnosis in clinical. The definitive diagnosis of IED is based on histopathology. Laparoscopic resection of the cyst is the preferred treatment. 

Graphical abstract

Gastric adenocarcinoma mimicking a submucosal tumor- a diagnostic pitfall in the pediatric population: report of two cases

Case Study

Abstract

Introduction: Pediatric gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) is sporadic with limited relevant data, and gastric adenocarcinoma, which presents as submucosal, has seldom been reported. The clinical presentation and outcome have not yet been thoroughly understood.

Case presentation: Two boys (10 and 14-year-old) were admitted to the hospital with severe malnutrition. Abdominal CT demonstrated the tumor protruding into the stomach, irregular border, and peritoneal metastasis. Gastric biopsies showed pleomorphic cells, variable size, and increased N/C ratio. These cells were arranged into sheet growth patterns, clusters of cells or incomplete tubules with neutrophils infiltrating. The malignant cells showed strong expression of CK, negativity for CD99, NSE, myogenin, CD3, CD20, ALK, and CD30. Both cases were consistent with poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinomas, diffuse type with lymphovascular invasion.

Discussion and Conclusion: Pediatric GAC presented with a more advanced stage and poor differentiation. However, the clinical presentation is similar to adult GAC. Because of data limitations, the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric GAC remain a significant challenge. GAC should be kept in mind, especially when a submucosal tumor-like lesion appears in the stomach. Additional molecular investigations, including E-cadherin or HER2 testing of the tumor samples, may offer more treatment choices for these patients. 

Graphical abstract

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